Katauta

History: The KatautaHistory: The Katauta is a lesser known Japanese form of poetry, traditionally called Waka and, as a term, means poetry fragment. The form specifically is written as half of an exchange with a lover and when paired with another Katauta, is called a Sedoka. So, a Katauta is half a Sedoka. The other...
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History: KnittelversHistory: Knittelvers, also Knüttelvers or Knittel, can be traced back to Otfrid of Weissenburg “who, using Latin verse as a model, introduced couplets into German verse in the 9th century. From the Middle High German knittel meaning "rhyme", but also knütte or keule meaning “club” because of it’s clumsy, irregular rhythm. Knittelvers was originally a German verse measure...
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History: The Lai is a tough poetry type to nail down the ins and outs of, as it’s been branded mostly obsolete since the 16th century and is now only interesting to poetry ubernerds (cough cough). The Lai is an Old French form originating in the 13th century. The oldest lais are attributed to Marie...
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History: The LannetHistory: The Lannet is an "invented" i.e. new form created by Laura Lamarca, around 2006 from what can be found on the internet, and is regarded as a type of sonnet. Structure: • 14 lines • 10 syllables per line • No end rhymes (only internal rhymes) • no meter or subject matter...
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History: The luneHistory: The lune, called and considered the American Haiku, was developed by New York based poet and Bard College professor Robert Kelly in the 1960s when he realized a lot was lost when the Japanese haiku was translated as a form into English, as Japanese words tend to have more syllables than English...
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History: LüshiHistory: Lüshi, Wade-Giles romanization lü-shih, is a specific type of Chinese poetry verse form that reached its final codification in the Tang dynasty(618–907), and is considered one of the most important poetry forms in classic Chinese poetry. Lushi is fun, and thick, and has a lot going on in writing it. Structure: An important...
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